TCU Advancement

University Advancement

Frequently Asked Questions

About Giving to TCU


  • Anyone in University Advancement would be delighted to assist you. The phone number for the Office of Development is 817-257-7800 or toll free 877-TCU-GIVE (828-4483) or make a gift online.

  • You can mail a check, call us to charge a gift to your credit card, or make a gift online.

  • You can mail your gift to:
    Texas Christian University
    TCU Box 297440
    Fort Worth, TX 76129

    TCU also accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover or American Express. Click here to make your gift online. Or contact us at 817-257-7800 or 877-TCU-GIVE (828-4483) to make your gift over the phone.

  • Whenever it's convenient for you. The dollars provided through annual giving enable TCU to make important choices as it pursues its mission, including hiring faculty, upgrading facilities and much more. Please remember — the University needs your support every year. (TCU's fiscal year runs from June 1 to May 31.)

  • Yes, you can support anything you wish — just specify on your check where you wish your gift to go. You give the University greater flexibility when you designate your gift to the “University’s Greatest Need.”

  • If you or your spouse work for a matching gift company, you could double or triple your gifts! Many companies will match donations made by employees, retirees and spouses. Check to see if your company has a matching gift program by clicking here. If your gift is matched, you receive gift club credit for the amount of the match. For example, a $500 personal gift matched 1:1 by your company would qualify you as a member of the Addison & Randolph Clark Society. Be sure to take advantage of the generosity of your company. It benefits both you and TCU!

  • Yes, your gifts are tax–deductible under the applicable sections of the Internal Revenue Code. A receipt for your gift will be sent shortly after the University receives your gift. Note: In cases where there are benefits associated with your gift (such as a dinner or golf tournament), the value of those benefits is deducted from the gift amount on the receipt.

 

Why Giving Matters


  • Since TCU is an independent university, strong support from alumni, friends, parents, corporations and foundations is vital. Public universities are supported with tax dollars, while private universities depend more heavily on tuition and private gift support. Only about 80 percent of the true cost of a TCU education is paid by the student. The rest comes from other sources, including philanthropy and income from the endowment.

  • Projects are determined through a strategic planning process, Vision in Action: The Academy of Tomorrow, and are generally based on TCU's Academic Plan and Facilities Master Plan. Following the strategic planning process, the Provost sets the priorities for academic projects to be funded. Once approved by the Provost, projects are sent to the University Advancement Office to assess possibilities for matching projects with potential donors.

  • During Fiscal Year 2013, $74.5 million was contributed by alumni, parents, friends, foundations and corporations. Gifts supported scholarships, innovative academic programs, the endowment and facilities.

  • The Annual Fund supports the TCU budget with contributions from alumni, parents, friends, corporations, foundations, faculty and staff. The Annual Fund gives the University the flexibility to respond to immediate opportunities and challenges. It helps to keep a TCU education attainable for deserving students. Annual giving also funds innovative educational and service programs. If you have questions concerning the Annual Fund, please call the Office of Annual Giving at 817-257-7800 or 877-TCU-GIVE (828-4483).

  • Your participation counts, not just in dollars, but also as a vote of confidence in the University. Annual giving is an indicator of the University's strength and quality, as well as a benchmark for corporations, foundations and organizations as they consider whether to give to TCU. By making an annual gift of any size today, you can show your support and have an impact on the University's future. The great power of donor participation is the strength of numbers. Together, we can achieve so much more than any one of us alone.

  • Yes. Gifts to the Frog Club underwrite annual scholarships for Horned Frog student-athletes and are counted in the Annual Fund.

 

Bequests and Planned Gifts


  • TCU's Office of Gift Planning, which includes a CPA and a Certified Financial Planner, is available to discuss ways that you can support TCU's mission and often receive tax benefits as a result. For information concerning bequests, trusts, charitable annuities, retained life estates and/or any questions you might have about estate planning, please contact TCU's Office of Gift Planning.

  • TCU's Office of Gift Planning, which includes a CPA and a Certified Financial Planner, is available to discuss ways that you can support TCU's mission and often receive tax benefits as a result. For information concerning bequests, trusts, charitable annuities, retained life estates and/or any questions you might have about estate planning, please contact TCU's Office of Gift Planning.

  • Once you have decided to include TCU in your will there are a couple of additional decisions to make: the size of your gift and how you want the University to use your gift. TCU's Office of Gift Planning looks forward to assisting you with either of these questions or any additional questions you may have. Sample language for both types of bequests can be found on the TCU Gift Planning website.

  • Yes, you may name TCU as the owner or a beneficiary of a life insurance policy. You can also name TCU as a beneficiary of retirement accounts. It is also possible to designate the use of these types of gifts. If you are considering doing this, please contact the Office of Gift Planning at giftplanning@tcu.edu.

  • TCU appreciates the opportunity to thank donors for future gifts, and the Britain Society is one way we do that. By letting TCU know of your gift intention during your lifetime, you ensure that the gift will be used as you intended. In addition, your generosity can inspire other donors to make a similar gift. Please contact TCU's Gift Planning team at 817-257-7299 or by email at giftplanning@tcu.edu if you have questions.

  • TCU accepts gifts of stocks, bonds and mutual funds. The University has the ability to receive these gifts in electronic or certificate form. Please contact the Office of Gift Planning at 817-257-7299, by email at giftplanning@tcu.edu or visit the TCU Gift Planning website for further details.

  • Yes, these types of gifts are referred to as gifts-in-kind and include items such as real estate, works of art, rare books or a collection of items. A gift of real estate can be used to accomplish your gift-giving goals, and the outright transfer of residential, commercial and agricultural properties to TCU may fit within your overall financial plan. Such gifts may provide income and/or estate tax benefits, the opportunity to escape the burden of selling or managing the property, and/or avoidance of capital gains tax if the asset has been held more than one year. The University's ability to accept gifts-in-kind is limited by our ability to use the gift in support of our mission. In some cases, TCU will ask you for approval to liquidate the asset so that proceeds can be used to accomplish your goal for the University. If you are considering a gift-in-kind, please contact TCU's Office of Gift Planning at 817-257-7299 or by email at giftplanning@tcu.edu.

 

Scholarships


 

Endowment


  • At Texas Christian University, the endowment comprises the long-term investment assets of the University. These assets are invested in perpetuity, and only a portion of the total return from the investments can be spent each year. Funds enter the endowment from two primary sources: gifts from donors and additions to long-term savings that are set aside by the Board of Trustees. Over the years, hundreds of donors have contributed to the endowment, creating endowment funds that support scholarships, faculty positions and other top priorities.

  • Endowed funds are created by donors who wish to establish permanent funds to support scholarships, chairs, professorships or other University programs. When assets are donated to an endowed fund, the gifts "buy shares" in TCU's endowed investment pool, which operates in a manner similar to a mutual fund. Endowed funds are named and used according to the donor's wishes. By law, only the income and related gains may be spent. The principal must remain intact. Any annual spendable income from an endowed fund is restricted and can be expended only for the fund's specified purpose.

  • The amount required to establish an endowed fund at TCU varies depending on the fund's purpose. For instance, $775,000 will endow a full tuition scholarship. Partial award scholarships can be established with any amount between that and $50,000. Likewise, an endowed professorship can be named with a gift of $1 million or more and an endowed chair for $2.5 million or more. Some donors choose to contribute over time, building toward the naming level of their fund with each gift. Regardless of how long it takes to fund a named endowment, the benefits will support the University and its programs far into the future.

  • TCU has focused on building the endowment because of its importance. As of September 2013, the University's endowment value exceeded $1.26 billion, a net increase of $83 million from the prior year. The endowment provided $57.1 million in FY 14 or 11% of the $511.8 million budget.

  • Endowed funds at TCU are invested by the University's chief investment officer (CIO), a seasoned investment professional, under the direction of the Investment Committee of the Board of Trustees. The CIO is responsible for working closely with the Investment Committee to maintain a current investment policy that governs decisions intended to maximize returns within appropriate levels of risk.

  • The Investment Committee has developed a strategic asset allocation model upon which the endowment's investment portfolio is based. The endowment is a broadly diversified portfolio of assets, including domestic and international equities, marketable and nonmarketable alternatives, fixed income securities, real estate and minerals.

  • For Fiscal Year 2014, the spending rate is 5.5 %, within the range considered to be the optimum sustainable payout rate to secure long-term value. The spending rate is applied to the average of a series of 12 quarterly market values to derive a fund's payout for one fiscal year. Each year, the Board of Trustees sets the endowment's spending rate at a level that provides a reliable source of income while maintaining the endowment's long-term purchasing power.

 

 

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Texas Christian University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award baccalaureate, masters, doctoral degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Texas Christian University.